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PROFILE AND REVIEW

NORWEGIAN CRUISE LINE

B
REAKAWAY CLASS
Cruise line profile - Norwegian Cruise Line - Breakaway class - profile and review
Above: Norwegian Getaway

Below: Norwegian
Escape
Above: Norwegian Breakaway.
Left: Norwegian Encore.

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NORWEGIAN BREAKAWAY PROFILE

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NORWEGIAN CRUISE LINE  PAGE

NCL  FLEET GUIDE
NORWEGIAN
CRUISE LINE
Above: Norwegian Breakaway.
Above: Norwegian Joy (Photo
courtesy of NCL).

Below: Norwegian Bliss.
Norwegian Breakaway cruise ship
Norwegian Getaway cruise ship
Norwegian Escape cruise ship
Norwegian Joy cruise ship
Norwegian Bliss cruise ship
Norwegian Encore cruise ship
Norwegian Breakaway cruise ship
Norwegian Getaway cruise ship
Norwegian Escape cruise ship
Norwegian Bliss cruise ship
Norwegian Encore cruise ship
Above: Norwegian Getaway

Below: Norwegian Escape
Above: Norwegian Bliss.

Below: Norwegian Encore.
       Norwegian Cruise Line's Breakaway
class includes
Norwegian Breakaway,  
Norwegian Getaway, Norwegian Escape,
Norwegian Joy,
Norwegian Bliss and
Norwegian Encore.  The latter four ships are
sometimes referred to as “Breakaway-Plus”
class because they are larger and have an
additional deck.  However, the overall design
and layout of the ships is similar.

       These are large cruise ships.  They range
in size from approximately 145,000 gross tons
for Breakaway and Getaway to over 165,000
gross tons for the four Breakaway-Plus ships.  
Interestingly, although the Breakaway-Plus
ships are larger, two of the four (Joy and
Encore) can accommodate less passengers at
double occupancy than Breakaway.   (Bliss
only slightly edges out Breakaway).

       The ships provide a casual, resort-like
cruise experience.  They offer passengers a
variety of alternatives in entertainment,
amusement-park features, bars, dining and
sports facilities.  The activities program is
geared to light fun but there is a sprinkling of
cultural enrichment.  

       Under Norwegian's Freestyle cruising
concept, guests are not assigned a table or time
for dinner in the three main dining rooms.  You
come to whichever dining room you like when
you want.  This works fairly well but if you
come during the peak dining hours, you may
have to wait to be seated.

       In addition to the main dining rooms, the
Breakaways have quite a few alternative
dining venues.  Of course, there is the large
buffet restaurant but there also are a number of
extra-tariff specialty restaurants and some
complimentary casual venues.  There are some
slight differences in the line-up of dining
venues on the various ships.

       While the bulk of these ships are devoted
to mass market cruising, each ship has “The
Haven,” an exclusive section for guests staying
in the suites.  In addition to luxury
accommodations, the Haven has its own
restaurant, bar, courtyard with a small pool
and open deck.  Guests can stay within the
Haven or venture out and use the rest of the
ship's facilities.  The Haven has a number of
concierges to assist the guests.

       All of the Breakaways except Norwegian
Joy also have an area for the exclusive use of
guests who are traveling solo.  These areas
include single-occupancy studio cabins and a
dedicated lounge.  A member of the ship's
activities staff organizes meetings and
activities for those solo passengers who want
to participate.

       A feature that is open to all is the
Waterfront, an outdoor promenade.  Unlike
traditional cruise ship promenades, these
promenades have outdoor seating for some of
the bars and specialty restaurants.  This can be
delightful on a warm night in the Caribbean.

The Breakaway class builds upon some of the
concepts that premiered with
Norwegian Epic.  
However, a number of the more radical ideas
from Epic were dropped.  For example, the
Breakaways do not have curving cabin walls
and except in the solo cabins, all of the
bathroom facilities in the cabins are located in
one place.

       Originally, each ship was dedicated to a
particular home port.  As the hull art indicates,
Breakaway was the New York ship and
Getaway was the Miami ship.  However,
following a change in the top management, this
deployment strategy ended.  Along the same
lines, Joy was built with the Asian market in
mind but after a season or so was brought back
to the Western Hemisphere.

       All of the Breakaways were built by
Meyer Werft in Germany.  They are good
quality ships.  All have pod propulsion systems
using electricity generated by diesel  engines.  
This makes the Breakaways maneuverable.  
Unlike Norwegian's
Jewel class, they are not
particularly fast with a top speed of
approximately 23 knots.